Is aluminum a non-biodegradable waste

That belongs in the organic waste bin

The following list contains biowaste that is basically suitable for recycling in accordance with the Biowaste Ordinance; however, this is not a binding list.

Which bio-waste can actually be collected separately in the bio-waste bin at the local level depends in particular on the specific recycling options and treatment facilities. The local public waste disposal authority is responsible for the binding stipulation of the bio-waste that is collected in the bio-bin on site. The waste management office of your municipality (city, municipality, district) will advise you on which waste can be put in the organic waste bin and which waste belongs in other collection systems and in the residual waste.

That belongs in the organic waste bin
  • Garden waste (e.g. overburden from beds, tree cuttings, tree bark, flowers, potting soil, hedge and shrub cuttings, leaves, needles, plants, plant parts, brushwood, moss, lawn and grass cuttings, weeds, weeds, twigs)
  • Hay, straw (small amounts)
  • Potted plants (without pots), also with potting soil
  • Cut flowers
  • Biowaste collection bags made of paper and labeled, certified biodegradable plastics
  • Leftover bread and baked goods
  • Eggshells
  • Fish scraps and bones (normal household quantities; if necessary, wrapped in kitchen paper / kitchen paper or newspaper, no glossy paper, e.g. from magazines, magazines, or paper from old wallpaper)
  • Meat and sausage leftovers (normal household quantities; if necessary, wrapped in kitchen paper / kitchen paper or newspaper, no glossy paper, e.g. magazines, magazines, or paper from old wallpaper)
  • Vegetable scraps, vegetable waste (for example potato peels, vegetable cleaning scraps and so on)
  • Salad leftovers, lettuce waste
  • Cheese scraps, including natural rind
  • Coffee filter bags, coffee grounds
  • Bones (normal household quantities; if necessary, wrapped in kitchen paper / kitchen paper or newspaper, no glossy paper, e.g. from magazines, magazines, or paper from old wallpaper)
  • Leftover dairy products
  • Nutshells
  • Fruit scraps, fruit bowls (also of tropical fruits, citrus fruits)
  • Leftovers, raw, cooked, spoiled (normal household quantities; if necessary, wrapped in kitchen paper / kitchen paper or newspaper, no glossy paper, e.g. from magazines, magazines, or paper from old wallpaper)
  • Tea bags, tea residues
  • feathers
  • hair
  • Small animal litter (only made of biodegradable material) including the excrement contained in small animals
  • Wood wool, wood shavings, sawdust (only from untreated wood)

That doesn't belong in the organic waste bin
  • ash
  • Flower and plant pots made of plastic (also certified biodegradable or labeled as compostable), clay, ceramic, glass, metal
  • Wire (for example flower binding wire)
  • Disposable dishes and cutlery made of plastic (also certified biodegradable or labeled as compostable)
  • Animal excrement (e.g. dog feces)
  • Glass
  • Gift ribbon
  • Rubber articles
  • Wood scraps, treated (e.g. impregnated, lacquered, glazed)
  • Hygiene items (tampons, sanitary towels, and so on)
  • Coffee capsules made of plastic (also certified biodegradable or labeled as compostable), aluminum
  • Rubbish
  • Ceramics, porcelain
  • Candle scraps
  • Small animal litter, not biodegradable (for example, mineral cat litter made from clay minerals such as bentonite and so on)
  • Carbon paper
  • Leather scraps
  • Medication
  • Furniture wood
  • Paper, cardboard, paper towels, paper handkerchiefs, napkins
  • Plastic bags, carrier and shopping bags made of plastic (also certified biodegradable or labeled as compostable)
  • Cleaning rags and cloths
  • soot
  • waste containing pollutants, problematic waste
  • Chipboard wood
  • Vacuum cleaner bags
  • Wallpaper
  • Carpets
  • textiles
  • Bandages
  • Packaging, for example made of plastic (also certified biodegradable or labeled as compostable), aluminum, glass, metal, composite packaging
  • Cotton wool, cotton swab
  • Diapers

Note on composting yourself:

Not all of the aforementioned organic waste are suitable for composting yourself, for example in the garden at home. Information and tips on professional and environmentally friendly composting and recycling, including suitable organic waste, can be found in the compost guide of the Federal Environment Agency. The compost primer can be downloaded free of charge from the Federal Environment Agency's website.