What are some typical bollywood papa dialogues

India

In India, the bed is not only there to sleep, but also a completely normal place to stay. My host sister only learns in bed and you are almost always in bed to watch TV or read. There we talk, make phone calls or watch films.

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Incidentally, the family has a very high priority here in India. So it is quite normal that the grandparents live in the same household and all relatives live nearby and often stand at the door spontaneously. One thing that still puzzles me is that all relatives have different meanings. The paternal grandparents (Dada and Dadi) have different names than the maternal grandparents (Nana and Nadi). And while in Germany we simply say aunt and uncle, here in India a distinction is made depending on whether it is the older or younger sister of the mother or the father.

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For the first time we saw the Indian streets where something always happens. Masses of people go about their daily activities, there are cows, monkeys, dogs, cats and sometimes even pigs walking around on the street. The traffic, apart from the animals, also consists of cars, bicycles, motorcycles and mopeds, on which usually two people sit, but sometimes a whole family. In front, between Dad's legs, there is a child, the father drives, then another child comes and the mother comes, sitting with her legs on one side, because she usually wears a suit. In addition, the traffic still consists of rickshaws and auto rickshaws, which are used here for public transport.

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It starts with the fact that every time I have to cross the street I'm almost scared to death in a city where the traffic is very orderly compared to the rest of India. So it has become a habit that whoever crosses the street with me takes me by the hand, like a small child. But the definition of child, especially for girls, is different here anyway. At the age of 16 I live here a much more sheltered life with much less freedom. In the beginning it was a big change for me that I can't even go out quickly to get something. But I've got used to it and I'm happy to be “little” Sophia here, especially since I'm the oldest of three siblings in Germany and I do a lot of things on my own responsibility.

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The first few days were difficult, but I quickly noticed that the people here in India are very helpful, friendly and attentive. According to the motto 'Sharing is caring', everything is shared here. Time, food, family, fun, friends. Even if it's only a little. That made it a lot easier for me to get used to.

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One experience that has shaped me a lot and keeps occupying me is poverty. I was picking up my older host sister from college when two kids suddenly knocked on our car window and asked for food. There was a boy and a girl. The boy was carrying another girl, maybe two years old. My host mom thought for a long time whether she should buy them something to eat, because most of these poor children don't even know what to do with money, they give it to their parents and there it is mostly used for drugs or alcohol. After thinking about it for a while, my guest mom let herself be softened and we bought the children food. The easiest dish to get in India. Daahl and roti, lentils and bread.
The smiling faces tore my heart apart. Because the two older ones were so busy eating that they completely forgot about the little one. So I started feeding them.

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The first train ride in India was something special. In front of the train station we were surrounded by people who wanted to carry our luggage and somehow they argued with our companion or with each other. After maybe a quarter of an hour all porters disappeared except for one, who then carried our suitcases, each about 23 kilos, on his head to the platform. When we entered the train station, we were first checked. You will actually do that everywhere, no matter where you go, e.g. also in the cinema. Our train was about three hours late. We waited sitting on a bench and watched the rats. People were sleeping all around us, lying on the platform. We actually only wanted to sleep, but sitting on a bench I couldn't sleep at that time. Perhaps now, since Indians can actually sleep anywhere. We then took the train for six hours. Fortunately, we were finally able to catch up on our sleep as we drove in the couchette car. The only not so nice thing about the train ride were the toilets.

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On this occasion I also come to the enormous police presence in North India and especially Delhi, caused by the fear of terrorist attacks by right-wing Pakistani in the wake of the Kashmir conflict. Every police officer carries a fully automatic hand weapon. In the entrance area of ​​every Metro station in Delhi, security guards can be found behind a heavy cover, the barrels of their assault rifles pointed at the inrushing passers-by. Whenever you enter the metro, you have to look into the barrel of a fully automatic rifle. A very depressing feeling.

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My brothers ran the family's small farm a few miles from our village. We had a couple of smaller fields that we could grow all year round depending on the season. In terms of landscape, the state of Punjab did not have much to offer, but agriculture constantly changed the landscape: in summer the irrigated rice fields, in winter the green potato fields and then in spring the golden wheat fields. So of course I also spent a lot of time in our little farm house, where the farmhands had shelter for cultivating our fields. I often asked myself whether this was also humane: these people worked hard in all climatic conditions and weather conditions, they always got enough hot meals and had a bed, but they toiled every day and hardly see their families who tried to to feed with their backbreaking jobs. Unfortunately this is a reality in India. As beautiful as the cultural and human diversity as well as the exotic can be: you can see this huge class difference between workers and a peasant family that lacks nothing and then the people who have the bare minimum. This difference is very present in India despite the abolition of the caste system. But many people have hope, hope for recovery and hope for an education for their children.

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I've already fallen in love with this country, with the food, the mentality and the kind of people, but above all the clothes are here (for me) just to rave about. I love to wear Indian suits, usually long tops with leggings or flared trousers, and it is even nicer to go to the appropriate shops.

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In addition, the streets, the means of transport and the traffic itself should not be imagined as in Germany. The roads have one pothole after the other and, as in England, there is left-hand traffic. But you don't even notice, because everyone is driving where there is space. Often three cars drive side by side on a two-lane motorway and it is teeming with motorcycles and scooters ... In addition, there is no one who does not horn constantly, as there is an unwritten law not to overtake a truck without honking.

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The people here can only be described as incredibly friendly and helpful and they really are tireless in trying to make themselves understood to someone who doesn't speak Hindi.

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The Indians are a very warm and pleasant people. Wherever I went, I saw faces that were both curious and friendly, and I was often invited spontaneously.

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Oh, and the "Indian punctuality" that has so often driven me to white heat! It says "We're going to a wedding at 10:30 am. So get ready!" Said and done. My German punctuality allows me to finish 10 minutes earlier. And what does my host family do? Twenty minutes later, everyone starts comfortably to go to the bathroom ... And once everyone is in the car, a vegetable cart usually comes by the side of the road and of course my gastoma first has to haggle over cauliflower! But that's the way it is. You should take it with serenity ... it's nice!

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It's a different culture and that has to be understood and respected first. For example, I was at an engagement ceremony where the couple met for the first time, or mostly there was no toilet paper ...

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I've seen incredible weddings. I got to know wonderful people. I realized how important family and real friends are to me. I realized that there are many ways to do something, and mine is not necessarily the right one. I learned how wonderful hospitality is and how nice it is to be treated like family, even though you didn't even know these people a year ago. I've seen how great India is and how amazingly good people can be. But that's nowhere near all I've seen. I've seen the dirtiest, dirtiest, ugliest spots on earth that you can imagine. I have seen how thousands of people live in a confined space under inhuman conditions.

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In the beginning I found it really difficult to tell people apart and to recognize them. Everyone has black hair, dark brown eyes, and brown skin.
I was of course very noticeable with my light brown hair and light skin. Whenever I looked out the car window and we were standing in front of a red light, I would certainly see five people staring at me. I went to the zoo once and felt like I was a bigger attraction than the animals. Certainly ten Indians asked me if they could take a picture with me. And when we lined up for the picture, we must have been picked up by ten other Indian cell phones.

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All the rumors that have been heard about Indian streets are true! But I have to say, I love the chaos of rickshaws, cows, street dogs, trucks, bicycles, small vans, pedestrians, motorcycles, "scooties" ... Here in Delhi you can find all kinds of things on the streets. I have already met elephants twice, walking through the streets in brightly colored decorations. Road rules don't really exist here either. Here you drive in serpentine lines, jostling and as fast as possible. Cows and cycle rickshaws hold back traffic, while bicycles, pedestrians and street dogs have to evade. Crossing a street safely takes half an hour, so everyone just kind of runs to the other side.

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Above all, dancing is very popular in India and almost everyone dances: boys, girls, whether young or old, without shame and very well.

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“Loving is sharing.” You hear this saying very often in India and it is also very important. Another important saying is: "What is yours is mine". When you sit down to have lunch at school during your lunch break, you don't even ask each other whether you can try. It goes without saying that you help yourself. It was a bit strange for me at the beginning, especially because Indians don't say “thank you”, “please” and “sorry”. Indians say that there is no such thing in friendship. "Thank you," "please," and "sorry" are for business only! Once it happened to me that I was late for lunch and a friend ate my lunch. When I asked who it was, she just said: "That was very tasty, can you bring that tomorrow too?"

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Family life is very different in India. Compared to Germany, much more value is placed on family and a little less on friends. A lot is done with the family, which is the most important place of exchange. Often you live with your grandparents and they and the elderly in general are very respected. Children stay with their parents until they get married, and even after that many continue to live with their parents.

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In August we celebrated the Indian "Independence Day" (Independence Day). We decorated the whole house with Indian flags and in the morning we watched the big national parade on TV, at the end everyone proudly sang along with the Indian national anthem. It is that day Also tradition, as my host brother described, that every boy in the whole country flies a kite. But flying just one kite would be pretty boring. It's about cutting the cords of other kites with your own covered with tiny shards of glass. The art is to cut the strings of as many other dragons as possible. I tried and failed, but we had a lot of fun anyway.

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A cultural peculiarity in India is that it literally only "goes with your head through the wall". You won't find any queues here, there is shoving and jostling. The first person is usually served who shouts the loudest. She will play badminton Most of the time it was downright haggling over the points, usually the one with the longest breath gets the most points. At the beginning I was very astonished and shocked at the same time, but as strange as it may sound, it is just part of this culture.

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"How do you actually see us Germans in India?" I asked myself this question many times in the run-up to my exchange year, and now I have an answer. Germany is seen as the ultimate technology and automotive country. A German car brand is seen as the status symbol. A German washing machine manufacturer, for example, also advertises with the slogan "We're German, we're mad about machines." (We are Germans, we are crazy when it comes to machines.) A classmate asked me in astonishment when he saw my mechanical pencil if I could get him a "German" pencil, which was particularly funny because these pencils are available in almost every shop in India, but also on Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich I was approached very often, because most Indians are of the opinion that Hitler brought down the British Empire with the Second World War and thus helped them to a large extent to achieve independence.

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On a short trip to Old Delhi, we have the other side of India
got to know: the full, somewhat smelly and polluted Delhi. The crossing
the road was really scary, because somehow nobody obeyed the rules of the road and you just walk on it. I was really scared of getting run over! A picture that I will certainly never forget: a whole family (father, mother and two children) on just one motorcycle. All I can say about it: INDIA!

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Everything is colorful and the women wear their suits and saris. However, teenagers all wear the same European clothes as we do.

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India is often described as diverse and you realize very quickly that it really is. Each of the 28 states has its own dance style, specialties, and even clothing. The same applies to people, what applies to one family is different in the next family. The rules for eating and behaving in every household are very different and you always have to adapt. Most families have some things in common. In almost every family, the father has the last word and the elders are the most respected, whether it's your own grandma or an old woman on the street. In India you are a baby until you get married and you are treated that way.

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One of the nicest things about India is the streets. For me the Indian roads are the best in the world. When the other exchange students and I entered the old town of Delhi on the first day, I was paralyzed. It was sensory overstimulation and I wondered how I would survive in this country this year. You can't capture an Indian street in a picture, however good it may be. All these religions, social classes and animals that meet here and live together peacefully. It is teeming with mopeds with entire families on them, rickshaws, flashy BMWs and vegetable sellers pushing their carts in front of them. Generally there is honking all the time. My host father always said “if you don't make yourself loud you could end up being overlooked”. Of course there are also the sacred cows that add to the chaos. The screaming of the vendors and the prayer chants from the temples, which can still be heard from afar, always go along with the whole honking. It stinks and smells always on Indian streets: all the exhaust fumes, the stench of animals, and the smell of flower stalls and food stalls. It was one of the nicest things for me to sit behind my sister or mother on the moped and zoom through the streets, because something always happens on Indian streets.

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But over time you get used to the obvious and, above all, cultural differences and learn to appreciate them.So I always find it fascinating how the respect for the elderly is capitalized here. Here is a small example: a short form of "yes" is used among friends; but once an elderly, respectable person is attending a conversation, the normal form of "yes" is spoken to show respect for that person.

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In the afternoon we drove to the Thunder Zone, a kind of small amusement park with a small swimming pool. Unfortunately, the wave pool is only for men and women have to swim in the children's paddling pool, even if this rule makes sense as most of them cannot swim. But still I found that a bit discriminatory. The swimwear was also a little different than what we are used to in Germany, we all wore capri pants and T-shirts as swimsuits.

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The most noteworthy thing in my village is the center, a huge, big tree around which every day, the men of the village, old men with turbans and white beards, but also many young ones, sit after work and drink tea and play cards and a lot about discuss life. I know that when you hear it like that, there is nothing special about it, but still: this picture exudes something calm and wise, in times of hectic and globalization.

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We were slowly approaching my birthday which was a fun experience. Firstly, at midnight, according to Indian tradition, my host family gave me cakes and a small present.

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If you sit in the car and wait for the traffic light to turn green, the children come running to the windows and beg for money. In addition, as a "white man" I am asked particularly frequently and intensively about money. If you give them money, it doesn't stay at ten rupees, they usually want more and you are "punished" for your willingness to donate. They also learn which cars I sit in and what I look like and that's how you build a “relationship” in a certain way. At some point you know those who keep standing by the windows.

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Weddings are celebrated very lavishly in India. So it is not uncommon to quickly spend money worth a small car on the wedding of the bride and groom and the celebrations that go with them. In addition, this is a way of showing what you have, even if it is of course always above the normal standard.
In January the time had come: a cousin of my host mother celebrated his wedding and we were invited. The whole thing was drawn up on a very large scale. So, as part of the close family, we first flew to the hometown of the bride, where the wedding traditionally takes place. Weddings in India take place in such a way that the wedding takes place at the bride's hometown and the bride then says goodbye to her family and is taken by the groom to his hometown and his family. There is then a big welcome party and afterwards the bride is part of the family and mostly lives in the house of the groom's parents. So you usually have insurance for old age if you have a son who lives with his family in your own house. For this reason, boys have a higher priority in the traditional view, among other things because the groom's family does not have to pay a dowry. This is the traditional procedure, but it is no longer so strictly adhered to today, as more and more western influences are coming into the country.

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More than half of all Indian residents are engaged in agriculture. So does my family - albeit as privileged landowners. My "uncles" and "cousins" are responsible for cultivating the fields together with the field workers. But since I liked the countryside so much, I was always “part of the party” when it came time to go back to the “village”, by which the farm was meant. My cousin picked me up at home - he lived on the other side of town - and we drove out into the country. For me it was always a kind of vacation or a short trip. I am not used to driving further away to a completely different area over the weekend, including an environment that brings new rules and a different life with it. It's hard to imagine, but as a child or teenager you get a different level of importance there; I was put in the role of taking responsibility and helping the "big guys" in their work while learning and appreciating what family means. It was like a new freedom that you can experience through it.

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It was the day of the festival "Uttarayan", which means something like "competition of dragons". So my friend goes to his buddy in the store and they discuss today's strategy. Which kites stay in the air the longest, which lines are particularly strong and at the same time particularly sharp-edged? You have to take into account in your calculation that such a kite consists of little more than thin paper and wooden struts as thick as shashlik skewers. So we have a few hundred meters of the best line stretched on a reel and then buy 30 or 40 kites in various sizes. Then the meeting point: roof. It is quite normal in India for the roofs to be flat. People hang their laundry there and, if necessary, have places to sleep if the air conditioning fails on a summer night and the house becomes a sauna.

Many people are already standing on the neighboring roofs and are about to let their kites fly into the air. We too are starting our preparations and are very busy working. Up to that point I didn't really know what to do, but my friends explained everything to me and I started to equip the paper kite with a certain technique with the tensioned cord. It took a few tries before the kite was in the air. Now it was a matter of straddling the neighbors' flight path and cutting the connecting line to his kite with his own line. Either you let your own kite race into the opponent's kite at high speed and hope for a good end, or you give your kite more and more line so that it climbs higher and higher. As a result, the tension on the cord is so strong that the cord cut into my own flesh. This made the cord work like a knife that could be used against enemy cords. This was our tactic and I started cutting through the first dragons. The whole thing ended with a new record of “beheaded dragons” and a few cuts in my hand. I will remember this event particularly fondly because - as I look back on it - it combined several things that make India what it is for me: being together with my host family, who have grown dear to my heart, experiencing a typical regional custom, the Feeling a sense of freedom when you are respected, even if you are not yet 18 years old (and my cousins ​​were significantly younger ...) and can communicate linguistically in such a way that you share jokes and wisdom with each other.