What is the relative location of Seattle Washington's

View the relative latency for Azure regions from specific locations

  • 5 minutes to read

warning

This feature is currently in the preview version and will continue to be checked for stability.

This tutorial shows you how to use the Azure Network Watcher service to decide which Azure region to deploy your application or service to based on your demographic user structure. You can also use the service to evaluate service provider connections to Azure.

Create a component for network monitoring

If you already have a network monitoring component in one or more Azure regions, you can skip the tasks in this section. Create a resource group for the network monitoring component. In this example, the resource group is created in the US East region, but you can create it in a different Azure region.

Create a network monitoring component. You must create a network monitoring component in at least one Azure region. This example creates a network monitoring component in the US East region.

Compare relative network latencies to a single Azure region from a given location

Assess service providers or troubleshoot a user reporting an issue such as a slow website from a specific location for an Azure region where a service has been deployed. For example, the following command returns the average relative ISP latencies between Washington state and the Azure West US 2 region from December 13-15, 2017:

Note

The region you specify in the previous command does not have to be the same as the region you specified when you obtained the network monitoring component. The previous command only requires that you specify an existing network monitoring component. The network monitoring component can be located in any region. Valid values ​​must be specified for and. The values ​​are case-sensitive. Data is available for a limited number of countries / regions, US states, and cities. Run the commands under View Available Countries / Regions, US States, Cities, and Providers to display a list of available countries / regions, cities, and US states for use with the previous command.

warning

You must enter a date for and that is a maximum of 30 days ago. If you specify a date that is earlier, no data will be returned.

The output from the previous command is as follows:

In the output returned is the value for Score the relative latency of different regions and providers. The value 1 stands for the highest latency, the value 100 for the lowest. The relative latencies are averaged for the day. The previous example clearly shows that the latencies were the same on both days and that there is a small difference between the latencies of the two providers. However, it also clearly shows that the latencies for both providers are low on a scale of 1-100. While this is to be expected because Washington State is located near the Azure US West 2 region, sometimes the results are not as expected. The larger the date range you specify, the better at calculating the average latency over the entire period.

Compare the relative network latencies in Azure regions from a specific location

If, instead of specifying the relative latencies between a specific location and a specific Azure region, you want to determine the relative latencies for all Azure regions from a specific location, you can do that too. For example, if your primary users are Comcast users in Washington state, the following command will help you assess which Azure region you can provide service in:

Note

Unlike specifying a single location, if you don't specify a location or specify multiple locations, such as US West 2, US West, you must specify an Internet Service Provider when you run the command.

View available countries / regions, US states, cities, and providers

Data is available for specific ISPs, countries / regions, US states, and cities. To see a list of all available Internet service providers, countries / regions, US states, and cities for which you can view data, type the following command:

Data is only available for the countries / regions, US states, and cities returned by the previous command. The previous command requires that you specify an existing network monitoring component. In the example, the component is used for network monitoring NetworkWatcher_eastus in a resource group called NetworkWatcherRG specified. However, you can specify any existing network monitoring component. If you don't already have a network monitoring component, create one by completing the tasks in Create a network monitoring component.

After you run the previous command, you can filter the returned output any way you want by using valid values ​​for Country, State and City specify. For example, to see the list of Internet Service Providers available in Seattle, Washington, USA, type the following command:

warning

The specified value for Country must consist of upper and lower case letters. The values ​​for State and City must consist of lowercase letters. The values ​​must be listed in the output that appears after the command is run with no values ​​for Country, State and City is returned. If you choose the wrong case or a value for Country, State or City that is not included in the output returned after the command is run with no values ​​for these properties, the output returned will be blank.