Which elective should I take?


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Hello everybody,

I am now in the 9th semester and should slowly decide what kind of elective I will take in the PY. It is already certain that I will not do any of the subjects that are available later.

But I ask myself whether I should therefore choose a smaller, more manageable subject (e.g. uro) where, according to rumors, you can get a good grade at my university with less effort or not rather take what I find most from the list interested (anesthesia) and what will bring me later, because I would like to drive an ambulance too, but learning this subject is much more time-consuming and extensive.

Then I think to myself that 16 weeks is a long time if you have to go there every day and it doesn't really interest you (Uro).

On the other hand, how important is the Stex note later ???

Maybe someone had the same problem. I would be happy to receive messages!

LG rhythm

What kind of subject do you want to do later?

In any case, take a subject that interests you, everything else is nonsense. If you say you are interested in anesthesia AND you can use it later: do it.

And who says that you get a worse grade with anesthesia than with uro?

In any case, do something that you either want to do later (the chance is high of being taken on immediately if you are in a good position and a position is available) or something that you want to do if you want to do, for example, interior and surgery (what you yes covered by the compulsory tertial anyway), in addition helps ... Anesthesia is always good there.

In my opinion, grade is completely sausage (like everyone in medical studies)! And the subject does not necessarily have to do with the grade. Rather your interest and your motivation for the subject.

What previous speakers say. The PY is dragging on, and if the subject is of no interest to you, you will not have any fun learning in the PY AND while studying. I wouldn't recommend it. And learning anesthesia isn't that wild either ...

Hello,

thank you for your opinions.

So, I started studying and thought I always want to do heart surgery. I also find the subject totally fascinating, but the longer you get to experience everyday university life on such stations (it's only a fraction anyway), the more argues against it, I think. Especially as a woman too.
I am writing my dissertation in cardio and find interventional cardio extremely interesting, so I would like to do cardio later.

And yes, 4 months can be a long time if you don't care. The rumor goes around at my university when you take anesthesia for an optional subject and get pharmaceuticals as a fourth subject. That wouldn't be so great, especially because pharmaceuticals is the most demanding subject for us. And that's exactly how the rumor goes around that Uro should be fairly relaxed in the oral.
But I also think that you can always need anesthesia, no matter what you do later.

Even if it turns out to be pharmaceuticals or pathos, they'll let you get away with it - that's mainly what it's about. And it's better to have an uncomfortable exam situation for 2 days than to be bored in a subject for 4 months, which is not of interest to you!

Usually there is a list of oral examination groups hanging up somewhere, for this autumn, possibly also for spring (still).
Instead of believing any rumors, I would look at this list first. We also had the rumors that if you were to be tested at the university, you would definitely get Pharma or Patho, and not even someone was tested in Pharma or Patho or Immunology.

and which elective did you take?
Dear all,
I have to hand in my registration in a few days and I don't know which elective to take?
I fluctuate between radio, Ana and Derma. Later I want to do inside.
I would be very happy if someone from the old hands would contact me and maybe help me with my decision.
I asked a similar question in the doctor's forum but did not get a reasonable answer. that convinced me.

I had Neuro and will also do internals. I was very happy with it and it was okay to learn for the M3.

Neuro is not mine!
Had someone taken their radio elective?
If you really learn how to find the pictures well and what about radiation therapy / nuclear medicine, that's a lot of physics, that's what I'm most afraid of!
With anesthesia you have to act quickly and I'm a rather calm guy here and not fit enough in practical terms (not at all, not even put Viggo properly)
Derma is such a special little subject exciting, however, to see a lot of disgusting things and I will cut that almost every day.

Neuro is not mine!
Had someone taken their radio elective?
If you really learn how to find the pictures well and what about radiation therapy / nuclear medicine, that's a lot of physics, that's what I'm most afraid of!
With anesthesia you have to act quickly and I'm the type here rather calm and in terms of practicality not fit enough (not at all, not even put Viggo properly)
Derma is such a special little subject exciting, however, to see a lot of disgusting things and I will cut that almost every day.

Haha, like reading about myself. I'll only start in the radio in two weeks, so I can't tell you how it is, but the internship in the radio was totally chilled and I strongly assume that it will also be the following 4 months. Did I learn something in the clinical traineeship? Nope. I found my internship in anesthesia much more boring than in the radio: But in both cases it was up to me. The only clinical traineeship in which I learned a lot was with the family doctor. Was on the family doctor: D This time I want to set goals that I try to achieve so that I have a guide. I think you should do that too. Write down what you would like to experience, see and learn in the 4 months and in the subject in which you can think of more points, you should do your PJ there. LG

Hey :) So I did my radio elective. In the meantime I didn't need any physics etc. - nobody asked me about that and you don't need that so blatantly for the sole finding. How much physics you need for M3 depends entirely on the examiner. Mine said in the preliminary talk that he didn't ask for any technology. I found radio a useful elective, even if I want to go inside. I can now see a lot more, especially in the chest x-ray, and can say much more reliably whether it is, for example, congested or an incipient pneumonia is present. You can read that through so often in the book, but you only see it better when you examine many pictures in quick succession. Of course, Sono is also an advantage for the interior, which I did quite a bit.
So in the end it is like any elective - the learning effect depends on what you are allowed to do and who is supervising you and the exam depends solely on the examiner: D

So in the end it is like any elective - the learning effect depends on what you are allowed to do and who is supervising you and the exam depends solely on the examiner: D

:-opinion

You will find advantages and disadvantages in each subject. In the end, however, you have to make the decision on your own. You've gotten some arguments for and against the fans both here and in your other thread. But none of us can make the decision for you.

How well you learn to find out about radio pictures depends very much on your PJ department. And from you. From nothing, comes nothing. Sitting down and expecting everything to be pre-chewed will not work. Radiation therapy / NUK is not included in every PJ house and is more used for observation. You will certainly not have to derive any physical laws. But if you lie flat on your back beforehand and "oh god, I can't do that!" shout, then it will certainly not work. But remember that these subjects can also meet you as a 4th subject. So even without a radio PJ you can come across this in your exam.

You probably won't see any more disgusting things in the derma than in the inside. What do you usually do, what awaits you inside?

I'm going to do anesthesia in my final year and then want to become an anesthetist too. Reason? I think anesthesia is cool: D
If you can't even do a decent viggo, then PJ in anesthesia would actually be quite useful for you. Because you will be laying a lot of viggo and practicing, practicing, practicing. If you are an intern, the nurses also expect you to be able to do that and then it would only be an advantage if you can do it and not rumble helplessly in the patient's veins. Anesthesia in itself is actually more of a quiet subject. During unspectacular anesthesia, you have plenty of time to have the anesthetists explain everything to you in detail and to ask questions. In the end, a 1: 1 support, which is certainly not a disadvantage for cautious people. As a PJler, you will not be in charge of the Rea team or the shock room alone. But especially if you are practically not really fit and also rather cautious, you can learn a lot in anesthesia which will help you internally later. You will have emergencies there too and then you have to react. Then it would make sense if you had already done it as a PJler in the "protected framework".

Up until the last day, I hesitated between radio and anesthesia as an optional subject - precisely because there are very good arguments for both. There is no right or wrong. I think I'll come into situations more often later in which I would have benefited a lot from an anesthesia PFY. And the same will happen to former anesthesiologists with the radio. I think you have to get away from "this is the only right way" at some point and find your own. The exciting (and annoying: D) thing about medicine is that, in the best case scenario, you should have an idea of ​​everything for every patient.

Yes it is not an easy decision. You are all right and thank you for the answers.
@ Odile1 so it will probably work for me until the last day Without a solution 😕

Most of these rumors are (at least at my university) pure nonsense.

If you want to know if this is true with Pharma, ask your LPA. If you want to know whether this is correct with the level of difficulty, ask people who are currently doing anesthesiology or urology M3 for the corresponding protocols.

Always check against reputable sources - never believe blindly.

It would be a shame if you did something other than your first choice, just because of some nonsensical rumors.

Is there anyone who has completed pediatric surgery or forensic medicine as an elective and can report on his / her experiences?

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