What's in a scene

Lexicon of film terms

scene

of .: skene = Hut, tent; the skene In the Greek theater there was a wooden hut built on the edge of the orchestra, on the roof of which mainly gods appeared

(1) The scene or the Appearance is a rehearsal-related section of a play. The division into acts or elevators, which results from the logic of the action, and the division into images (tableaux), which is explained by the changes in decoration. With more modern pieces since the 20th century, these three criteria of subdivision sometimes get mixed up.

Literature: Pfister, Manfred: The drama. Theory and analysis. Munich: Fink 1977, chap. 6. number New edition

(2) scene is also synonymous with stage used, e.g. B. in the phrase "transformation in the open scene". What is meant is the stage that the audience can see, that is, the “stage of the game”.

(3) A scene is part of a film that is usually made in the script. Compared to the sequencewhose formal independence often results from assembly forms (as with the comparison and parallel assembly), is referred to by the term scene the continuity of the observed action, a unit of interaction, communication or action that is often reminiscent of the situation in everyday life or the theater scene. According to the traditional rules of dramaturgy, a scene begins when the person constellation on the stage changes (Entrer en scene - a person is added; sortir de scene - a person leaves). It is the connection of time, place and characters that is something like that scenic unit let arise, a totality of the actions of the actors, which enjoys relative autonomy vis-à-vis the environment. Change of scene is the clearest indicator of scene boundaries. In an action scene, the depicted time and depiction time ideally coincide; On the other hand, there is almost always a time jump between scenes, which is further accentuated by a change in the plot. Modally independent scenes (such as dreams, fantasies, some memories.) Play a special role.

Literature: Levine, Sanford: The 247 best movie scenes in film history. A filmgoer's guide to cigar scenes, car chase scenes, haircut scenes, whistling scenes, dentist scenes, fluttering drapes, funny walks, mirrors, name mispronunciations, parking meters, sagging shoulders, steambaths, and numerous other scenes long noted by aficionados. Jefferson, NC [...]: McFarland 1992. - McGee, Robert: Story. Substance, structure, style, and the principles of screenwriting. New York: Regan Books 1997, pp. 252-287.
 

Credentials:

Diorama I: illusion scenes

dramatic scene

erotic scene

posed scene

Great scene

funny scene

Crowd scene

non-fictional scene

obligatory scene

Key scene

Sequence and scene

Climax


Article last changed on 11/13/2012


Author: WHJW


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