When was George V born?

George V (United Kingdom)

George Frederick Ernest Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (* June 3, 1865 in Marlborough House, London, † January 20, 1936 in Sandringham) was as George V. King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (Northern Ireland since 1927) and Emperor of India from 1910 until his death in 1936.

Life

Origin and childhood

George V was born as the second son of the later Edward VII of Great Britain and his wife Alexandra of Denmark. He was the cousin of both the German emperor Wilhelm II and the Russian tsar Nicholas II. He also had a great external resemblance to the latter. Georg V came from the German princely house of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, but was the first British monarch since 1714 to speak English without a German accent.

Prince of Wales

In his youth he served in the Navy and toured many parts of the British Empire. He carried the title Duke of York. Georg was an avid hunter and liked to let the clocks in Sandringham go a little faster in order to have more time for his hobby: Sandringham Time. After the death of his older brother Albert Victor in 1892, he became the official heir to the throne and as such was appointed Prince of Wales in 1901.

On July 6, 1893, at St. James’s Palace, he married the British-German Princess Maria von Teck, who had been the fiancée of his late brother. The marriage was happy and Georg adored his wife very much. He had six children with her:

  • Edward (23 June 1894 - 28 May 1972), Prince of Wales, as Edward VIII, King of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Emperor of India, after his abdication Duke of Windsor ∞ Wallis Simpson (1896–1986)
  • Albert (December 14, 1895 - February 6, 1952), Duke of York, as George VI. King of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Emperor of India ∞ Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (1900–2002)
  • Maria, Princess Royal (April 25, 1897 - March 28, 1965), ∞ Henry Lascelles, Earl of Harewood (1882–1947)
  • Heinrich (March 31, 1900 - June 10, 1974), Duke of Gloucester ∞ Lady Alice Montagu-Douglas-Scott (1901-2004)
  • Georg (December 20, 1902 - August 15, 1942), Duke of Kent ∞ Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark (1906–1968)
  • Johann (July 12, 1905 - January 18, 1919)

From 1905 to 1907 Georg was Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

government

In 1910 the Prince of Wales as George V succeeded his father as King of Great Britain and Ireland and was born on December 12, 1911[1] crowned Emperor of India on the so-called Durbar in Delhi. It was the only imperial coronation in India.

First World War and adoption of the name Windsor

Together with his cousin and brother of Wilhelm II, Prince Heinrich of Prussia, King Georg tried to prevent the start of the Great War in July 1914. Georg offered that Austria-Hungary could carry out his military action against Serbia, but waived the general mobilization. Only Emperor Franz-Josef I did not accept the offer and instead ordered the general mobile power of the k.u.k. Army. The outbreak of World War I led to massive anti-German sentiment in Great Britain. First of all, Georg's naturalized relative, the German Prince Louis von Battenberg, was at the center of the abuse, who was the first sea lord of the Royal Navy to ensure that Britain's fleet was mobile when the war broke out. Battenberg was removed from his offices, had to give up the title of prince and change his name to Mountbatten. The king made him Marquess of Milford-Haven. The German relatives of Georg's wife from the Teck family also received British nobility titles. The king described himself as completely British, but was viewed with skepticism by his subjects, especially after defending his German cousin Prince Albert of Schleswig-Holstein, who oversaw the British prison camp. When British Prime Minister David Lloyd George was once appointed King, he is reported to have said: "I want to know what my little German friend has to say to me."

When Georg's cousin, Tsar Nicholas II, was forced to abdicate in 1917, Georg refused his cousin asylum. Probably because of his German Mrs. Alix, who was hated in Great Britain. He wrote his cousin, with whom he was very friendly for many years, that he should rather take refuge in France or Spain, which meant that he did not intend to take any measures to save him. Georg had already had German banners removed from St George's Chapel in Windsor under public pressure, especially after personal intervention by Georg's mother. Well, Georg's insinuation in the Times that the court was "foreign" caused Georg to change direction. Georg is said to have replied furiously: "I may not be convincing, but I want to be damned if I'm a stranger."

House of Windsor was proclaimed on July 17, 1917. The king had renounced his German names and titles for himself and all of Queen Victoria's descendants. With this step, George made his popularity among the British population a major boost. Another cousin of George, Wilhelm II., Scoffed in Germany that he was already looking forward to the performance of the play "The merry women of Saxony-Coburg-Gotha". Wilhelm sent Carl Eduard, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (also a cousin of George), who appeared in Nazi uniform, to George's funeral.

Later years of government

Georg spent the next twenty years of reign calmly and without scandals. He shone by conscientiously fulfilling his royal duties. The independence of Ireland made it necessary for George to be King of Great Britain and 1927 NorthIreland had to change. His reign saw the first Labor government (1924-25) and the Great Depression (1931). George V was the first monarch to address his people in the Christmas address, which has now become a tradition.

He had a very mixed relationship with his eldest son. His association with a twice divorced American was considered sacrilege. Georg never received Wallis Simpson and also made his wife swear not to do so after his death. He said of his son with great foresight: "If I'm dead, the boy will be ruined within twelve months."

personality

Gold sovereign Georg V of 1927

The king was only moderately educated, poorly read and hardly interested in the fine arts and sciences. He spent a large part of his free time as an avid stamp collector (philatelist). He built the stamp collection of the British royal family, the Royal Philatelic Collection, on. Today it is one of the largest and most valuable in the world and became state property after Georg's death. He bought rarities from philately all over the world. At the auction of the world's rarest postage stamp, the British Guiana 1 ¢ magenta, it was outbid by Arthur Hind. This auction took place in the course of the dissolution of the Ferrary collection. His great enthusiasm for philately also ensured that the hobby spread in Great Britain.

His special passion was sailing. With the regatta yachtHMY Britannia, which he had inherited from his father King Edward VII, he took part very successfully in many regattas, especially at Cowes Week. On his deathbed he decreed that his beloved yacht should follow him into death. As requested, she was sunk off the Isle of Wight by a Royal Navy warship.[2]

In contrast to his urbane father, George V was considered unimaginative and pedantic. Like his father, he was an extreme smoker and had major health problems as a result. Even after lung surgery, he continued to smoke, so he got worse and worse. It is said that his personal physician, Lord Dawson of Penn, hastened his death, with Queen Mary's approval, by giving him an overdose of morphine and cocaine. George V died on January 20, 1936 in Sandringham. His coffin was first buried in the Royal Crypt under St. George's Chapel in Windsor Castle, but later transferred to a high tomb inside this chapel, in which Queen Mary also found her final resting place in 1953.

progeny

Single-digit names

  • are children of King George V and thus siblings
    • E.g .: Edward VIII. (1) and George VI. (2)

Two-letter names

  • are grandsons of King George V.
  • if the first digit is identical, they are siblings
    • E.g .: Elizabeth II (2.1) and Margaret (2.2)
  • everyone else is cousins
    • Example 1: Elizabeth II (2.1) and Prince Michael of Kent (5.3)

Three-digit names

  • are great-grandchildren of King George V.
  • if the first two digits are identical, they are siblings
    • E.g .: Charles (2.1.1) and Anne (2.1.2)
  • if the first digit is identical, it means cousins
    • E.g .: Charles (2.1.1) and David, Viscount Linley (2.2.1)
  • all others are great cousins ​​and great cousins
    • E.g .: Charles (2.1.1) and Gabriela Windsor (5.3.2)

Four-digit names

  • are great-great-grandchildren of King George V.
  • if the first three digits are identical, they are siblings
    • E.g .: William (2.1.1.1) and Harry (2.1.1.2)
  • if the first two digits are identical, they are cousins
    • E.g .: William (2.1.1.1) and Eugenie, Princess of York (2.1.3.2)
  • if the first digit is identical, it means great cousins ​​and great cousins
    • E.g .: William (2.1.1.1) and Samuel Chatto (2.2.2.1)
  • all others are great-great cousins ​​and great-great cousins
    • Example: William (2.1.1.1) and Albert Windsor (5.1.3.1)

Descendants Chalkboard

Descendants of George V.
children

(1)
Edward VIII (1894-1972) ∞ 1937
Wallis Simpson (1896-1986)

(2)
George VI. (1895-1952) ∞ 1923
Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (1900-2002)

(3)
Mary (1897-1965)
∞ 1922
Henry Lascelles (1882-1947)

(4)
Henry (1900-1974)
∞ 1935
Alice (1901-2004)

(5)
George, 1st Duke of Kent (1902-1942) ∞ 1934
Marina (1906-1968)

(6)
John (1905-1919)

Grandson of (2)

(2.1)
Elizabeth II (* 1926)
∞ 1947
Philip Mountbatten (* 1921)

(2.2)
Margaret (1930-2002)
∞ 1960-1978
Antony Armstrong-Jones (* 1930)

Grandson of (3)

(3.1)
George Lascelles (* 1923)
∞ 1949-1967
Marion Stein (* 1926)
∞ 1967
Patricia Tuckwell (* 1926)

(3.2)
Gerald Lascelles (1924-1998)
∞ 1952-1978
Angela Dowding (1919-2008)
∞ 1978
Elizabeth Evelyn Collingwood (1924-2006)

Grandson of (4)

(4.1)
William of Gloucester (1941-1972)

(4.2)
Richard, Duke of Gloucester (* 1944)
∞ 1972
Birgitte van Deurs (* 1946)

Grandson of (5)

(5.1)
Eduard Windsor (* 1935)
∞ 1961
Katharine Worsley (* 1933)

(5.2)
Alexandra Windsor (* 1936)
∞ 1963
Angus Ogilvy (1928-2004)

(5.3)
Michael, Prince of Kent (born 1942)
∞ 1978
Marie-Christine von Reibnitz (* 1945)

Great-grandson of (2.1)

(2.1.1)
Charles (* 1948)
∞ 1981-1996
Diana Spencer (1961-1997)
∞ 2005
Camilla Shand (* 1947)

(2.1.2)
Anne (* 1950)
∞ 1973-1992
Mark Phillips (born 1948)
∞ 1992
Timothy Laurence (* 1955)

(2.1.3)
Andrew (* 1960)
∞ 1986-1996
Sarah Ferguson (* 1959)

(2.1.4)
Edward (* 1964)
∞ 1999
Sophie Rhys-Jones (* 1965)

Great-grandson of (2.2)

(2.2.1)
David, Viscount Linley (* 1961)
∞ 1993
Serena Stanhope (* 1970)

(2.2.2)
Sarah Armstrong-Jones (* 1964)
∞ 1994
Daniel Chatto (* 1957)

Great-grandson of (3.1)

(3.1.1)
David, Viscount Lascelles (* 1950)
∞ 1979-1989
Margaret Messenger (* 1948)
∞ 1990
Diane Howse (born 1956)

(3.1.2)
James Lascelles (born 1953)
∞ 1973-1985
Frederica Duhrssen (* 1954)
∞ 1985-1996
Lori Lee (1954-2001)
∞ 1999
Joy Elias-Rilwan (* 1954)

(3.1.3)
Jeremy Lascelles (born 1955)
∞ 1981-19??
Julie Baylis (* 1957)
∞ 1999
Catherine Bell (born 1964)

illegitimate of 2nd wife
(3.1.4)
Mark Lascelles (born 1964)

Great-grandson of (3.2)

(3.2.1)
Henry Lascelles (born 1953)
∞ 1979-1999
Alexandra Morton (* 1953)
∞ 2006
Fiona Wilmott (born 1950)

illegitimate of 2nd wife
(3.2.2)
Martin Lascelles (* 1962)

Great-grandson of (4.2)

(4.2.1)
Alexander Windsor (* 1974)
∞ 2002
Claire Booth (* 1977)

(4.2.2)
Davina Windsor (born 1977)
∞ 2004
Gary Lewis (* 1970)

(4.2.3)
Rose Windsor (* 1980)
∞ 2008
George Gilman (* 1982)

Great-grandson of (5.1)

(5.1.1)
George Windsor (born 1962)
∞ 1988
Sylvana Tomaselli (* 1957)

(5.1.2)
Helen Windsor (born 1964)
∞ 1992
Timothy Taylor (born 1963)

(5.1.3)
Nicholas Windsor (* 1970)
∞ 2006
Paola Doimi di Delupis de Frankopan (* 1969)

Great-grandson of (5.2)

(5.2.1)
James Ogilvy (born 1964)
∞ 1988
Julia Rawlinson (* 1964)

(5.2.2)
Marina Ogilvy (born 1966)
∞ 1990-1997
Paul Mowatt (born 1962)

Great-grandson of (5.3)

(5.3.1)
Frederick Windsor (* 1979)

(5.3.2)
Gabriella Windsor (* 1981)

Great-great-grandson of (2.1.1)

(2.1.1.1)
William (* 1982)

(2.1.1.2)
Harry (* 1984)

Great-great-grandson of (2.1.2)

(2.1.2.1)
Peter Phillips (* 1977)
∞ 2008
Autumn Kelly (* 1978)

(2.1.2.2)
Zara Phillips (* 1981)

Great-great-grandson of (2.1.3)

(2.1.3.1)
Beatrice (* 1988)

(2.1.3.2)
Eugenie (* 1990)

Great-great-grandson of (2.1.4)

(2.1.4.1)
Louise Mountbatten-Windsor (* 2003)

(2.1.4.2)
James Mountbatten-Windsor (* 2007)

Great-great-grandson of (2.2.1)

(2.2.1.1)
Charles Armstrong-Jones (* 1999)

(2.2.1.2)
Margarita Armstrong-Jones (* 2002)

Great-great-grandson of (2.2.2)

(2.2.2.1)
Samuel Chatto (* 1996)

(2.2.2.2)
Arthur Chatto (* 1999)

Great-great-grandson of (3.1.1)

(3.1.1.1)
Emily Lascelles (* 1976)

(3.1.1.2)
Benjamin Lascelles (* 1978)

(3.1.1.3)
Alexander Lascelles (* 1980)

(3.1.1.4)
Edward Lascelles (* 1982)

Great-great-grandson of (3.1.2)

(1st marriage)
(3.1.2.1)
Sophie Lascelles (* 1973)

(1st marriage)
(3.1.2.2)
Rowan Lascelles (born 1977)

illegitimate from 2nd marriage:
(3.1.2.3)
Tanit Lascelles (* 1981)

(2nd marriage)
(3.1.2.4)
Tewa Lascelles (* 1985)

Great-great-grandson of (3.1.3)

(1st marriage)
(3.1.3.1)
Thomas Lascelles (* 1982)

(1st marriage)
(3.1.3.2)
Ellen Lascelles (* 1984)

(1st marriage)
(3.1.3.3)
Amy Lascelles (* 1986)

(2nd marriage)
(3.1.3.4)
Tallulah Grace Lascelles (* 2005)

Great-great-grandson of (3.1.4)


(3.1.4.1)
Charlotte Lascelles (* 1996)


(3.1.4.2)
Imogen Lascelles (* 1998)


(3.1.4.3)
Miranda Lascelles (* 2000)

Great-great-grandson of (3.2.1)


(3.2.1.1)
Maximilian Lascelles (* 1991)

Great-great-grandson of (4.2.1)


(4.2.1.1)
Xan Windsor (* 2007)

Great-great-grandson of (5.1.1)


(5.1.1.1)
Edward Windsor (* 1988)


(5.1.1.2)
Marina-Charlotte Windsor (* 1992)


(5.1.1.3)
Amelia Windsor (* 1995)

Great-great-grandson of (5.1.2)


(5.1.2.1)
Columbus Taylor (* 1994)


(5.1.2.2)
Cassius Taylor (* 1996)


(5.1.2.3)
Eloise Taylor (* 2003)


(5.1.2.4)
Estella Taylor (* 2004)

Great-great-grandson of (5.1.3)


(5.1.3.1)
Albert Windsor (* 2007)

Great-great-grandson of (5.2.1)


(5.2.1.1)
Flora Ogilvy (* 1994)


(5.2.1.2)
Alexander Ogilvy (* 1996)

Great-great-grandson of (5.2.2)


(5.2.2.1)
Zenouska Mowatt (* 1990)


(5.2.2.2)
Christian Mowatt (* 1993)

literature

  • Tom Levine: The Windsors. Paperback - September 2007
  • Helmut-Maria Glogger: The Secret Life of the Windsors. The whole truth. Paperback - December 2006
  • Kenneth Rose: King George V. Weidenfeld and Nicolson, London 1983, ISBN 0-297-78245-2.
  • Herbert Gantschacher: "Witness and victim of the Apocalypse - The Austrian composer Viktor Ullmann in the First World War as an artillery observer witnessed the poison gas attack on the Isonzo front on October 24, 1917 near Bovec (Flitsch / Plezzo) and in World War II as a victim of destruction by poison gas on May 18 .October in Auschwitz "Catalog for the exhibition, Arnoldstein-Salzburg-Wien2007

Web links

Literature on George V (United Kingdom) in the catalog of the German National Library

Individual evidence

Source reference